Thune featured in Runner’s World: Sen. John Thune is among the lawmakers featured in the November issue of Runner’s World Magazine, for a story called “Running Mates” on politicians who like to run.
The story centers around the ACLI Capital Challenge, a three-mile race whose participants include senators like Thune, Kelly Ayotte and Chuck Grassley.
Thune is highlighted as the “fastest man in Congress”:

Among the fastest runners to round the orange cones is Republican Senator John Thune of South Dakota. He’s tall and lean with knotted biceps, and the effort of holding a 6:15 pace is etched on his face — his jaw is locked in a grimace and his eyes are fixed on the ground just ahead of him. The 51-year-old longtime runner and chairman of the Senate Republican Conference has been the fastest man in Congress since 2009 (his race PR is 18:54 set in 2011). Thune grew up in the tiny town of Murdo, South Dakota, where spring floods buried his high school’s track, forcing his team to do intervals on the local airstrip where “a half mile never looked so far.”

Thune’s running prowess is respected by his Senate colleagues, the article notes. Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., set the event record with 18:15 30 years ago, and says he doesn’t “talk about it much because Senator Thune would train too hard and beat it.”
Thune praises the race as “a great bridge across the divide of the competing parties.”
"You develop relationships that transcend the day-to-day acrimony," he says in the article.
I won’t spoil the entire article; look for the issue on newstands to find out how Thune does in the Capital Challenge, as well as a collection of facts about the intersection of politics and running.

Thune featured in Runner’s World: Sen. John Thune is among the lawmakers featured in the November issue of Runner’s World Magazine, for a story called “Running Mates” on politicians who like to run.

The story centers around the ACLI Capital Challenge, a three-mile race whose participants include senators like Thune, Kelly Ayotte and Chuck Grassley.

Thune is highlighted as the “fastest man in Congress”:

Among the fastest runners to round the orange cones is Republican Senator John Thune of South Dakota. He’s tall and lean with knotted biceps, and the effort of holding a 6:15 pace is etched on his face — his jaw is locked in a grimace and his eyes are fixed on the ground just ahead of him. The 51-year-old longtime runner and chairman of the Senate Republican Conference has been the fastest man in Congress since 2009 (his race PR is 18:54 set in 2011). Thune grew up in the tiny town of Murdo, South Dakota, where spring floods buried his high school’s track, forcing his team to do intervals on the local airstrip where “a half mile never looked so far.”

Thune’s running prowess is respected by his Senate colleagues, the article notes. Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., set the event record with 18:15 30 years ago, and says he doesn’t “talk about it much because Senator Thune would train too hard and beat it.”

Thune praises the race as “a great bridge across the divide of the competing parties.”

"You develop relationships that transcend the day-to-day acrimony," he says in the article.

I won’t spoil the entire article; look for the issue on newstands to find out how Thune does in the Capital Challenge, as well as a collection of facts about the intersection of politics and running.

Tags: John Thune